test

id name usage height min height max width min width max temp min temp max pH min pH max kH min kH max CO2_min CO2_max NO3_min NO3_max PO4_min PO4_max Fe_min Fe_max licht oorsprong groeisnelheid moeilijkheid link text1 text2 remarks
4 Cryptocoryne amicorum front 15 15 0 0 22 28 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 normal Sumatra slow advanced https://aquaplants.org/pics/cryptocoryne_amicorum.JPG Deze smalbladige helgroene lancetvormige Cryptocoryne is niet één van de makkelijkste planten. Slaat de plant eenmaal aan dan is dit soort zeer geschikt als voorgrond plant of voor een kleiner aquarium. De plant groeit rustig en zal regelmatig nieuwe bladeren maken. This narrow-leaved bright green lanceolate Cryptocoryne is not one of the easiest plants. Once the plant takes hold, this type is very suitable as a foreground plant or for a smaller aquarium. The plant grows quiet and will regularly make new leaves.
6 Cryptocoryne beckettii front, mid, group 10 25 0 0 15 30 0,00 0,00 1 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/cryptocoryne_beckettii.JPG Sterke Cryptocoryne, makkelijk te houden in ieder aquarium. De decoratieve bladeren zijn groen aan de bovenzijde en lichtbruin tot rood aan de onderzijde met roodkleurige bladstelen. Deze Cryptocoryne vormt onder goede omstandigheden uitlopers met jonge planten. This intensively coloured plant with its green and brown colour nuances is a beautiful, very widely spread Cryptocoryne spp. from Sri Lanka. It belongs in the C. wendtii group, it is readily available and it has been in use in aquaristics for over 60 years. It is very easy to cultivate, and possesses the typical characteristics of a Cryptocoryne from Sri Lanka. It adapts well to soft as well as to hard water, light is relatively unimportant, even though it grows better under more intensive light. The brown-green rosettes that form soon after the plant is placed in the tank spread quickly and form dense bushes. Nutrient-rich substrates enhance growth. The plant reacts nicely to ample fertilisation and to CO2, but it grows sufficiently well without these components, too. It may be cultivated emersed in moist substrates rich in nutrients, where it is known to flower. When cultivated emersed, it is recommendable to spray daily with water. The propagation of C. beckettii is not difficult. It forms runners on its rhizome, which can be cut off and replanted. Most Cryptocoryne species from Sri Lanka are predestined to grace the middleground of an aquarium and can be kept in form by trimming very well. With its reddish-brown pointed leaves, this species contrasts very well against other plants.
7 Cryptocoryne bullosa mid 20 30 0 0 22 30 6,00 8,00 3 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 less - normal Sri Lanka normal advanced https://aquaplants.org/pics/cryptocoryne_bullosa.JPG De prachtige donkerbruine bladeren van de Cryptocoryne bullosa hebben een lichte bobbelstructuur in het blad. Zoals veel donkere planten heeft dit soort niet veel licht nodig om goed en gezond te groeien. Zeer geschikt om in groepen aan te planten. The beautiful dark brown leaves of the Cryptocoryne bullosa have a light bump structure in the leaf. Like many dark plants, this variety does not need a lot of light to grow well and healthy. Very suitable for planting in groups.
16 Cryptocoryne affinis front, mid, group 10 30 0 0 12 30 0,00 0,00 3 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium Malaysia slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne affinis Hook. f. is distributed on the Malayan Peninsula (western Malaysia). It forms dense, mainly submersed populations on sand- and gravelbanks in rapidly flowing rivers and rivulets. Some of them lie in limestone areas. This species was so widely spread in the hobby in earlier times that it was considered to be "the" Cryptocoryne. Around 1939 it was first mentioned as aquarium plant, and in the 1950s it was very popular under the name Cryptocoryne haerteliana (Haertel's water trumpet). Today, however, C. affinis is only found in low numbers even though new collections were made in its native habitat. This is probably due to the fact that similarly-looking species like C. wendtii and C. beckettii are far easier to propagate emersed in aquatic plant nurseries. Recently it became known that some other species (maybe C. wendtii?) are sold under the incorrect name Cryptocoryne affinis. True C. affinis is better available from other hobbyists, not from trade. C. affinis is a very variable plant, there are forms that differ in height or leaf colour, and those with smooth to strongly bullous leaves, however, these characteristics can change a lot with the conditions the plant is kept in. One of the more frequently cultivated, smaller forms, e.g., has lanceolate leaves whose upper side is "silky" and dark green, with lighter-coloured yellowish-green longitudinal veins. Other forms have a clear brown leaf pattern. The underside can be light green to wine red. Its final size also depends a lot on the conditions the plant is kept in: under stronger light and when planted at a distance the leaves lie relatively flat, and the plants form a rather low-lying carpet of only 10 cm in height. Dense groups under low light can grow to a height of around 40 cm, though. The leaves of emersed plants mainly lie spreaded on the ground. The species C. affinis is best identified by its striking inflorescence, which seems to develop only infrequently in cultivation, unfortunately. The blade of the spathe is 3 to 20 cm long, its inside is of a dark purple, and it forms narrow spirals of 4 to 15 turns. This crypt is an ideal plant for low-tech tanks with low light and no CO2 injection. It does well in hard water. After some time it forms subterranean runners, which help it to form dense, vast populations. Though C. affinis may be rather undemanding, it is quite susceptible to "crypt melt". This phenomenon often occurs if conditions like lighting or nutrient ratios change too quickly.
17 Cryptocoryne albida front, mid, group 5 15 0 0 6 30 5,00 8,00 2 12 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Thailand, Myanmar slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne albida is distributed in southern Myanmar and Thailand. It is a highly variable species belonging to the group of Cryptocoryne crispatula. Different forms are known from aquarium culture, some of them green, some of them brownish in colour. In nature, these forms are known to occur in the same populations.
18 Cryptocoryne aponogetifolia back 0 70 0 0 15 30 0,00 0,00 7 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium - high Philippines medium very easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cichlid proof plant, Specimen plant
19 Cryptocoryne beckettii "Petchii" front, mid, group 10 15 8 15 15 30 5,50 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0 3 0 1 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ De Cryptocoryne beckettii “Petchii” is een kleine variant van de Cryptocoryne beckettii, die mooie, licht geribbelde bladranden heeft. Net als bij veel andere Cryptocorynes, hangt de bladkleur en vorm grotendeels af van de omstandigheden in het aquarium. De plant vermeerderd zich door het vormen van uitlopers. Zorg dus voor een niet al te stevige bodemstructuur zodat de uitlopers niet al te veel hinder ondervinden. De uitlopers vormen vanaf de moederplant een lange sliert aan nieuwe plantjes. Trek je 1 plantje uit de bodem dan komen de andere plantjes vanzelf mee. Cryptocoryne’s houden er niet van om verplaatst te worden. Knip dan ook de uitloper door met een schaartje om alleen de ongewenste of verkeerd geplaatste plantjes te verwijderen. Cryptocoryne kun je snoeien door de lange bladeren zo dicht mogelijk bij de rozet af te knippen. Hierdoor ontstaan vanzelf weer nieuwe bladeren. Niet alle bladeren tegelijk verwijderen maar begin met de grootste en laat de kleinste bladeren staan. Als er voldoende kleine bladeren bij zijn gekomen kun je de grootste weer wegknippen. Eén of twee keer per jaar kun je ook de hele plant eruit halen en de scheuten herplanten. Cryptocoryne hebben ijzer nodig. Veel aquaria hebben een tekort aan ijzer wat de planten kunnen opnemen. Aan een Cryptocoryne is het goed te zien als ze een ijzer tekort hebben, de bladeren worden dan geel. Voeg in dat geval vloeibare ijzermest (Fe) toe om de plant weer gezond te krijgen. Cryptocoryne’s kunnen slecht tegen plotselinge veranderingen in omstandigheden. Schommelingen in temperatuur, ineens veel meer/minder licht, verplaatsen van de plant etc kan er toe leiden dan de bladeren gaan verslijmen. Als je zorgt voor stabiele waterwaarden en omstandigheden en de plant verder met rust laat komt het vaak vanzelf weer goed. The triploid form of Cryptocoryne beckettii was originally described as a species on its own, namely Cryptocoryne petchii. However, this beautiful and very widely spread plant, which belongs in the C. wendtii group, is readily available and has been in use in aquaristics for over 60 years. It is very easy to cultivate, and possesses the typical characteristics of a Cryptocoryne from Sri Lanka. It adapts well to soft as well as to hard water, light is relatively unimportant, even though it grows better under more intensive light. The brown-green rosettes that form soon after the plant is placed in the tank spread quickly and form dense bushes. Nutrient-rich substrates enhance growth. The plant reacts nicely to ample fertilisation and to CO2, but it grows sufficiently well without these components, too. It may be cultivated emersed in moist substrates rich in nutrients, where it is known to flower. When cultivated emersed, it is recommendable to spray daily with water. The propagation of C. becketii is not difficult. It forms runners on its rhizome, which can be cut off and replanted. Most Cryptocoryne species from Sri Lanka are predestined to grace the middleground of an aquarium and can be kept in form by trimming very well. With its reddish-brown leaves and the slightly wavy leaf rims, this species contrasts very well against other plants.
20 Cryptocoryne beckettii "Petchii Pink" front, mid, group 5 15 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0 3 0 1 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
21 Cryptocoryne beckettii "Viridifolia" front, mid, group 15 20 10 15 20 30 6,00 8,00 3 15 5 40 10 50 0 3 0 1 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
24 Cryptocoryne ciliata mid, back 10 35 0 0 20 28 6,00 8,00 2 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 medium - high Asia slow medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Semi-emersed plant for open tanks, Specimen plant
25 Cryptocoryne cordata var. siamensis mid, back 0 0 0 0 17 30 4,50 7,00 2 12 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium Thailand, Malaysia slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Specimen plant
26 Cryptocoryne cordata var. siamensis 'Rosanervig' mid, back 0 0 0 0 17 30 4,50 7,00 2 12 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium Thailand slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Specimen plant
27 Cryptocoryne coronata mid, back 0 0 0 0 15 28 6,00 8,00 7 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Philippines slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cichlid proof plant, Specimen plant
28 Cryptocoryne crispatula var. balansae mid, back 0 60 0 0 8 30 6,00 9,00 5 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 50 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Thailand slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne crispatula var. balansae is found in rivers and rivulets in southern Thailand, where this variety of C. crispatula forms dense, mostly submersed populations with bandlike leaves floating in the current. When the water is low, some of these plants fall dry and then form flowers. The habitats of this Cryptocoryne are often found in areas with limestone rocks, so the water is hard and rich in calcium. C. crispatula var. balansae has been in the hobby for a long time, it is easy to cultivate and highly adaptable. It can grow to over 50 cm in height. There are different forms of var. balansae, one of the most common ones has leaves about 2 cm wide. However, leaf width can vary from 1.5 to 4 cm, and its colour may be anything between green and an attracive bronze hue. A typical characteristic of C. crispatula var. balansae are the bullous leaves with a hammered look. The variety C. crispatula var. flaccidifolia, quite similar to C. crispulata var. balansae, differs from it by narrower (0.5 to 1.2 cm wide), unhammered submersed leaves. In the hobby, there are several forms of this Cryptocoryne, which mostly differ regarding leaf width and colour - from green to an attractive bronze hue. This beautiful Cryptocoryne has proven to be a great aquarium plant, highly adaptable and easy to cultivate, which makes it one of the most popular Cryptocoryne species in aquaristics. Like all varieties of the Cryptocoryne crispatula group, this plant prefers a place under medium to high light. Under sufficient light, the "hammered" knobbly pattern of the leaves develops more pronouncedly. The addition of CO2 enhances growth but is not absolutely necessary. When continually supplied with sufficient nutrients via the water or the substrate, C. crispatula var. balansae develops into a beautiful plant. It grows fastest and lushest when nutrients supply is ample, especially nitrate, phosphate and iron. This variety prefers hard water, thus a good supply of calcium is important, too - as for most representatives of the Cryptocoryne crispatula group. A calcium deficiency results in deformed, curled leaves. Make sure that C. crispatula var. balansae grows in stable conditions; sudden changes of the environment may result in Crypt melt (as is the case for most Cryptocoryne species). When cultivated emersed, this Cryptocoryne does not reproduce as fast by runners as the submersed form. The flower stalks form most frequently on semi-emersed plants in shallow circulating water. Old populations growing under medium light are most likely to flower. The spathe (pseudo petal) of the flower stalk possesses a long tube. Its striking blade winds helically. The lower part of the spathe shows a pattern of purple lines and dots on off-white ground. During the summer months, this Cryptocoryne can even be kept in an outdoor pond. It is best planted in a pot. Old, well-established populations reproduce quickly by runners inside the substrate, which may spread far beyond the area its keeper has provided for them. Thus, a regular cutback of these runners is necessary. This is best done with a sharp knife or a razor blade. You can cut through the aquarium substrate to remove the runners (as if you were cutting the edge of a lawn), or you can just pull them out of the ground and replant them closer to the mother plant. Since C. crispatula var. balansae can grow to a height of over 50 cm under good conditions it is best suited for the background of a tank or for very high aquaria. A well-groomed cluster of Balansa's water trumpet is a beautiful solitary eyecatcher for a Dutch aquarium. It is also a great plant for nature aquaria as it adds height and contrast to horizontally placed driftwood or rock formations. It can invoke the impression of lush growth, and fish swimming through the leaves of this plant like through reeds are a highly attractive sight. Specimen plant
30 Cryptocoryne crispatula var. flaccidifolia mid, back 0 60 0 0 8 30 6,00 9,00 5 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Thailand medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne crispatula var. flaccidifolia is a variety of C. crispatula with long, narrow, smooth to undulate, green to reddish-brown leaves. The leaves of emersed plants are flaccid (flaccidifolia = "with flaccid leaves"). Submersed leaves grow to a length of 20 to 50 cm and a width of 5 to 12 mm. Its leaf width differs from that of C. crispatula var. tonkinensis (2-4 mm wide leaves) and from C. crispatula var. balansae (15-40 mm wide leaves). Moreover, var. balansae has bullous leaves, whereas those of var. tonkinensis and var. flaccidifolia do have a smooth to undulate margin but no bullous pattern in the leaves. This variety of Cryptocoryne crispatula is quite variable, like many other varieties of that plant, and there are intermediate forms, too. Thus, not all plant from the group of C. crispatula can be safely assigned to a variety. C. crispatula var. flaccidifolia is found in Thailand, Vietnam and Southern China (Guangxi), where it grows mainly submersed in rivulets and rivers. Those plants sold as "Cryptocoryne retrospiralis" in trade for many years probably all belong to C. crispatula var. flaccidifolia. True C. retrospiralis from India is only rarely in cultivation (Kasselmann 2010 and The Crypts Pages). The plant sold as "Cryptocoryne tonkinensis" in trade also usually do not belong to C. crispatula var. tonkinensis, but to C. crispatula var. flaccidifolia (www.heimbiotop.de). Cryptocoryne crispatula var. flaccidifolia may not be as well-known as var. balansae, but it is as recommendable, easy-to-care for aquarium plant. Its up to approx. 50 cm long leaves make it suitable for high tanks. It also does well in harder water and prefers moderate to intensive lighting. Like most other Cryptocorynes, C. crispatula var. flaccidifolia reproduces by subterranean runners, and after some time it forms a dense group. The narrower leaves of C. var. flaccidifolia look more grass-like than those of var. balansae, and fit beautifully to a Nature Aquarium layout. Specimen plant
31 Cryptocoryne crispatula var. kubotae Midground 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 medium - high Thailand slow medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ This extremely narrow-leaved plant from Eastern Thailand is known as "Cryptocoryne tonkinensis" for many years. However it turned out as a new variety of Cryptocoryne crispatula. It is described under the name C. crispatula var. kubotae by Jacobsen & al. (2015). The variety kubotae is distinct from the true, broader leaved var. tonkinensis that occurs in northern Vietnam and southeastern China (Guangxi). Nano tanks
32 Cryptocoryne crispatula var. tonkinensis mid, back 0 0 0 0 8 30 6,00 9,00 5 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Vietnam https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne crispatula var. tonkinensis comes from Vietnam and southeastern China (Guangxi). It is distinct from an extremely narrow-leaved plant from eastern Thailand that was long known as "C. tonkinensis", now described as a new variety (Cryptocoryne crispatula var. kubotae).
33 Cryptocoryne dewitii 15 30 0 0 0 0 6,00 8,00 0 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 medium - high Papua New Guinea slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne Dewitii is a rare crypt that makes an excellent mid-ground accent. This aquatic stem plant produces wide, spaded shaped leaves with a vibrant green color that stands out beautifully against hardscape material such as driftwood and stones. Cryptocoryne Dewitii will thrive best in an environment that is rich with nitrate, phosphate, iron, CO2, and calcium. A calcium supplement is highly recommended, as this species hails from Borneo where it inhabits limestone-bed rivers and streams with very high calcium content. Cryptocoryne Dewitii plants also need moderate to high lighting. This aquatic plant is much easier to grow submersed, but can also grow emersed. Mature plants with high light can potentially produce flowers when grown emersed. Similar to other Cyptocoryne plants, drastic changes in the environment may to detrimental, casing the plant to undergo “crypt melt”. The leaves of the plant begin to rot and essentially melt away. If this process begins, you can cut away any rot and attempt to stabilize the water. It is normal for crypts to melt when introduced to a new tank and should produce new growth once they have acclimated. Cryptocoryne Dewitii propagates by sending out runners which can be cut gently and replanted into a quality aquarium substrate.
34 Cryptocoryne fusca 10 25 15 25 22 28 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium slow https://aquaplants.org/pics/
35 Cryptocoryne griffithii 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Malaysia, Borneo slow https://aquaplants.org/pics/
36 Cryptocoryne hudoroi mid 20 50 0 0 18 30 5,00 7,50 2 12 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Borneo medium medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne hudoroi is a water trumpet with very narrow-oval, strongly bullous leaves comparable to C. aponogetifolia and C. usteriana, but with a distinctly smaller height (approx. 20 to 50 cm). This species grows in the south of Kalimantan (the Indonesian part of Borneo) in limestone areas where it forms dense submersed populations in rapidly-flowing rivers. When the water is low, these populations continue growing emersed. Up to now it has only been found in few locations. This Cryptocoryne was imported in the 1990s. Even though it is attractive and relatively easy to care for it is rather rare as aquarium plant.
37 Cryptocoryne keei mid 0 0 0 0 18 30 5,00 7,50 2 12 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Borneo medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne keei originates from rivulets in the west of the Malaysian part of Borneo (Sarawak). This species has strongly bullous leaves, comparable to the species C. bullosa, C. hudoroi and C. uenoi, which also originate from Borneo
39 Cryptocoryne lingua 0 0 0 0 18 30 5,50 7,50 2 12 10 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 Borneo very slow difficult https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne lingua is a water trumpet that grows to approximately 8-15 cm in height. Its somewhat succulent leaves are spatulate to ovate, 2 to 7 cm in length, 1 to 3.5 cm in width. Their upperside is waxy and smooth, and of a light green colour. The leaf stalk grows to 4 to 10 cm, and thus as long or longer than the leaf blade. This species is found in the Malaysian part of Borneo (Sarawak) in the freshwater tidal zone of rivers near the coast. The populations of that plant are regularly flooded by the tides. Other than Cryptocoryne ciliata, which lives in similar habitats, no marine water reaches the locations where C. lingua is found, but only dammed-up freshwater. [1] C. lingua sometimes is sold in the aquarium trade, however, it does not survive when cultivated constantly submersed and thus is not suitable as aquarium plant. It can be cultivated emersed, however, in loamy substrate. [1]
40 Cryptocoryne longicauda 20 50 0 0 25 30 0,00 5,00 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium Borneo, Sumatra slow difficult https://aquaplants.org/pics/
44 Cryptocoryne moehlmannii 0 0 0 0 18 28 6,00 7,50 1 15 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sumatra slow https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne moehlmannii is very much like C. pontederiifolia. Like the latter, it originates from an area on the western coast of Sumatra. Both species mainly differ by characteristics of the inflorescence (more precisely, the spathe), moreover, the leaf undersides and leafstalks of C. moehlmannii are light green (not reddish brown). This plant is comparable to C. pontederiifolia regarding its demands and usage in the hobby.
45 Cryptocoryne parva front, group 0 0 0 0 15 28 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 medium - high Sri Lanka very slow medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne parva, the smallest known water trumpet species, has its origins in the central highlands of Sri Lanka near Kandy city. It grows in dense colonies on riverbanks there. Recently it has been scarcely collected in the wild, and it is possibly to be considered an endangered species. In aquaristics, it has been known for a long time but hasn't been very widely spread, mostly due to its really slow growth. However, it is easily available in trade or from other hobbyists. The dwarf water trumpet is quite similar to those plants from the group of plants related to Cryptocoryne x willisii. Under comparable conditions it tends to stay smaller than those, as a submersed, non-flowering plant it is hard to be discerned safely from them, though. Earlier on, the name "Cryptocoryne nevillii" was used for both C. parva and C. x willisii alike, however, in reality this is the name of a totally different species. Cryptocoryne parva is a very slow grower even in optimal conditions. In contrast to other Cryptocorynes it needs a lot of light. The addition of CO2 and a substrate rich in nutrients or rather, fertilisation via the substrate enhance growth quite considerably and let the plant grow to its full potential. It is especially important to maintain iron and potassium on a relatively high level to prevent this Crypt from developing serious deficiency symptoms like chloroses and multiple holes in the leaves. The propagation of Cryptocoryne parva only requires the environmental conditions we stated above, and patience. The plant forms lateral shoots directly on its rhizome as well as runners - both faster and more efficiently when the plant is kept emersed. Its small size makes Cryptocoryne parva an ideal foreground plant, especially for small aquaria and nano tanks. It takes quite some time until it forms a lawnlike population, but it is its slow growth that renders this plant very easy in maintenance. Nano tanks, ground cover
48 Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia mid, back 0 0 0 0 18 28 6,00 7,50 2 14 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sumatra slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne pontederiifolia is a bog plant hitherto only found in the northernmost part of the west coast of Sumatra (Indonesia), where it grows in the freshwater tidal area together with the nipa palm (Nypa fruticans). Today, it is know to have been introduced into Singapore, where it grows on swampy ground along forestal rivers. This species has been long known in Europe as aquarium plant and is found in trade regularly. However, in the US it is still quite new and hard to come by. C. pontederiifolia is quite similar to Cryptocoryne moehlmannii, to which it is closely related and which is found in the same area in nature. However, those varietys commonly found in trade can be discerned quite well regarding characteristics of inflorescence and leaf coloration: - C. pontederiifolia: the blade of the spathe (pseudopetal) is of a sulphurous yellow or reddish colour on the inside, and the collar is wide and quite high. The leaves are brownish to light purple, especially on the underside. - C. moehlmannii: the blade of the spathe is of a dark purple on the inside, and the collar is narrow. The leaves are always of a light to olive green, not brownish. More recent collections from the habitat show a larger variability of the inflorescence, though. This robust Cryptocoryne species is unproblematic in cultivation and highly adaptable to different conditions in the aquarium. Water parameters may range from soft to hard and from slightly acidic to neutral. Fertilisation with CO2 and intensive light induce more compact growth and a bushier look, whereas medium to low light results in longer stems and overall higher-growing plants. The pink Crypt needs several weeks to adapt to new conditions and to regenerate, only then will it start growing again. After some time, it picks up speed and grows to a sizable plant rather quickly. In contrast to most other Cryptocoryne species, C. pontederiifolia is not very susceptible to Crypt melt in cultivation. It can be propagated by runners starting from the mother plant, which form a nice group in time. Its wide leaves, some of them with a slight nubby pattern, make C. pontederiifolia an excellent choice for the middle- or background of medium-sized and large aquaria, where they can be used as an alternative to Anubias. It is also used for plant streets in Dutch aquaria. However, it is also suitable as a focal point in nature aquaria, contrasting dark mosses and grass-like plants. In medium-sized tanks it can even be used as eyecatching solitary plant. Specimen plant
50 Cryptocoryne × purpurea 0 0 0 0 17 30 5,00 6,00 2 16 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium Malaysia slow medium https://aquaplants.org/pics/ This water trumpet was first found in Kota Tingii in western Malaysia, and in 1902 the director of the Botanical Garden Singapore, H.N. Ridley, described it as Cryptocoryne purpurea. In the 1960s, de Wit named it as most common aquarium plant in Europe and America. Today it has probably disappeared from aquarium cultivation, and it is only still cultivated by a few specialised hobbyists, mostly in the emersed form. Typical C. x purpurea from the Malayan peninsula was identified in 1982 by Niels Jacobsen as a natural hybrid of C. cordata var. cordata and C. griffithii. The most well-known population of this crypt is the vast marshland of Tasek Bera in Pahang.
51 Cryptocoryne pygmaea front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 18 28 6,00 8,00 8 20 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Philippines easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne pygmaea, dwarf crypt, comes from the Philippines. Other than its botancial and vernacular names suggest it doesn't stay especially small. On the islands Palawan, Busuanga and in western Mindanao this crypt populates rivers and rivulets, often with hard water, emersed as well as submersed, also in deeper water. For a long time it was only known from herbarium records. Most authors synonymised it with C. auriculata, which originates from Borneo (Sarawak). Only in about 1970 the first live specimens became known in Europe. In Kopenhagen, Niels Jacobsen found them in a shipment of C. aponogetifolia originating from the Philippines, and later identified them as C. pygmaea. In 1999, Jan Bastmeijer and Herson Morco found many natural habitats of this species in the north of Palawan. [1] C. pygmaea has proven to be an excellent aquarium plant that is quite easy in cultivation [2],[3]. Despite that, this crypt is not very well-known in the hobby yet. In nature and in emersed cultivation, C. pygmaea stays rather small (approx. 5 to 8 cm in height), however, its submersed form grows distinctly larger (up to 25 cm hight). Its emersed elaves have a lanceolate leaf blade, whereas the submersed leaf blades are lineal. The leaf margin is undulate, and the leaves are of a brown-green colour. In cultivation, this plant has shown to be quite variable and that there are forms with slightly differing leaves and inflorescences [1].
52 Cryptocoryne retrospiralis 0 0 0 0 18 30 5,00 8,00 2 20 5 40 0 0 0 0 0 0 medium - high India https://aquaplants.org/pics/
53 Cryptocoryne sivadasanii mid, back 40 120 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 medium - high India slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
54 Cryptocoryne spiralis var. caudigera mid, back 20 35 15 20 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 medium - high India medium very easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Specimen plant
55 Cryptocoryne spiralis var. spiralis 0 0 0 0 20 30 5,00 8,00 2 20 10 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 .5 low - medium - high India, Bangladesh medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne spiralis is a narrow-leaved water trumpet from the Asian mainland. It is found in the south of India and in Bangladesh, where it grows on riverbanks, temporarily flooded wetlands and in rice paddies, where it is considered a weed. Its species name hints to the spiralling spathe blade (up to five turns) of its inflorescence. The species is quite variable, two varieties have been described (var. spiralis and var. cognatoides), but there are also intermediate forms. Those plants imported some time ago were more or less difficult in cultivatikon and only of limited use in the aquarium. However, the form of C. spiralis that is found in the hobby today is quite easy in cultivation and reproduces well by a large number of runners. It was brought from India by Prof. C.D.K. Cook in the 1990s. As long as it does not bloom, the emersed form of C. spiralis is very hard to discern from plants from the Cryptocoryne crispatula group, like C. retrospiralis or C. albida.
56 Cryptocoryne undulata front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 28 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Like so many other species from the Cryptocoryne wendtii group (= C. beckettii group), C. undulata has long been known in the hobby. In nature, it is found emersed and submersed along rivers and rivulets on the island of Sri Lanka. C. undulata is as easy in cultivation as the other species from the group of plants related to C. wendtii. This species grows even in unfertilised water and under low light, however, growth is very slow then, and the overall height of the plant increases. When planted in nutrient-rich substrate and provided with lots of light its growth rate increases, however, the plants will stay smaller as a whole. Under these conditions, the mother plant will form many runners, and the plant mass can grow substantially within just a few months. It is not necessary to fertilise this plant with CO2. Due to its compact growth, it should not be planted too densely. It is highly recommendable to plant small portions at a few centimetres' distance in order to provide them with room to grow. This plant is best cultivated emersed in moist substrates and daily spraying with water. C. undulata is uncomplicated to propagate, simply cut off the runners growing close to the mother plant and replant where you want them. After taking root, the young plants develop into grown specimens relatively fast. Its brown, slightly undulated and sometimes marbled leaves make C. undulata a very special plant and a great eyecatcher for the middleground of an aquarium. It contrasts nicely with bright green and intensively red plants, and its effect is especially nice when it is planted behind a population of low-growing light breed plants like e.g. Helanthium tenellum or Ranalisma rostratum.
57 Cryptocoryne undulata 'Broad Leaves' front, mid, group 15 25 10 20 15 28 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
58 Cryptocoryne usteriana mid, back 0 0 0 0 15 28 6,00 8,00 7 21 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Philippines slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne usteriana is a very large Cryptocoryne that can grow to a height of up to 70 cm. It grows mostly submersed in rivers on the Philippine island Guimaras. For a long time, the larger C. aponogetifolia was not discerned from C. usteriana. This is the reason why the plants that are cultivated under the name C. usteriana are in many cases truly C. aponogetifolia. Like C. aponogetifolia, true C. usteriana grows best in hard water. This preference as well as its size makes it a very recommendable plant for Lake Tanganyika and Lake Malawi Chichlid tanks. Cichlid proof plant, Specimen plant
59 Cryptocoryne walkeri 'Hobbit' front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
60 Cryptocoryne walkeri front, mid, group 10 25 10 25 15 29 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
61 Cryptocoryne walkeri "legroi" front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
62 Cryptocoryne walkeri "lutea" front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 29 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
63 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Flamingo' front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
64 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'brown' front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
65 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Florida Sunset' front, mid, group 25 35 15 30 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
66 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Green Gecko' front, mid, group 5 15 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
67 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' mid, back. group 25 35 15 30 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' is another beautiful variety from the group of plants related to C. wendtii, with its reddish-brown well-structured leaves. It is only found in Mi Oya river on Sri Lanka, where the water is very warm. Tropia company was the first aquatic plant nursery to add this plant to their product range and to distribute it commercially. All in all, this species is a variety of C. wendtii that's not so very common in the hobby. The cultivation of Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' is quite easy. A substrate rich in nutrients enhances growth. Light plays a decisive role in the growth habit of this variety. Lots of light results in a horizontal leaf position, whereas little light prompts C. wendtii 'Mi Oya' to grow vertically. An addition of CO2 is not required. Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' does not tend to rot, like so many other representatives of the C. wendtii group. This species is easy to cultivate emersed. All it needs are a substrate rich in nutrients and a high air humidity. Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' adapts quickly from submersed to emersed cultivation. Propagation is as uncomplicated. Runners provide the keeper with a continually high number of plantlets, which can simply be replanted to the place their keeper wants to cultivate them further. As one of the largest-growing Cryptocorynes from the wendtii group, Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Mi Oya' is best placed in the middleground or in the background of smaller aquaria, where it forms a nice eyecatcher.
68 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'green' front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
69 Cryptocoryne wendtii 'Tropica' front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 5,00 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka medium easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/
70 Cryptocoryne × willisii "lucens" front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 4,50 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Cryptocoryne x willisii is a group name comprising many different varieties of Cryptocoryne which are presumably hybrids of Cryptocoryne parva and related species (C. walkeri, C. beckettii) occuring in nature. They are distributed in the area around Kandy city in the central highlands of Sri Lanka, where they grow on river banks. Their leaves are oblong-ovate to narrow-lanceolate, with an even, unpatterned medium green colour, which resemble those of Cryptocoryne parva but grow bigger (emersed to 25, submersed to 20 cm in height). The blade of the spathe (the pseudopetal) is rough to tuberculate and is quite variably coloured, often dark purple or reddish brown. The plant described as Cryptocoryne lucens by H.C.D. De Wit in 1962 is one variety from the C. x willisii hybrid complex that is quite commonly found in the hobby. It has long been known as robust, relatively small-staying aquarium plant. The submersed form of this Cryptocoryne has very narrow, lanceolate leaf blades and differs thus from the plant a long time erroneously known as "Cryptocoryne nevillii" with its oblong, ovate to lanceolate leaves. Please see Cryptocoryne x willisii “nevillii”. The leaf margin of C. x willisii "lucens" may show a brownish colour and a slight undulation. Cryptocoryne x willisii "lucens" reproduces - like other Cryptocorynes - by underground runners as well as by offshoots growing directly on the rosette, which can simply be cut off. The plant is as easy in cultivation as Cryptocoryne wendtii or C. beckettii. Compared with these relatively broad-leaved plants, often of a brownish colour, this Cryptocoryne is more similar to C. parva, the smallest Cryptocoryne, however, it grows significantly larger and a lot faster. C. x willisii "lucens" lends itself to creating narrow-leaved, dense, medium green bushes in the fore- and middleground of aquascapes. In tanks of sufficient height, C. x willisii "lucens" can even be used as grass-like ground cover. It is a slower-growing alternative to some Helanthium species, whose runners are often too invasive. In dense, high-grown tufts of C. x willisii "lucens" the rhizomes have been known to grow upright; then they should be trimmed back considerably. Nano tanks
71 Cryptocoryne × willisii "Pigmea" front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0,00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Nano tanks, ground cover
72 Cryptocoryne × willisii "nevillii" front, mid, group 0 0 0 0 15 30 4,50 8,00 1 18 5 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 low - medium - high Sri Lanka slow easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ This Cryptocoryne is a very popular, undemanding, low-growing aquarium plant that reproduces through runners, forming nice ground-covering carpets. It was long known under the name "Cryptocoryne nevillii", and sometimes still is. In 1976, Niels Jacobsen found out that it really belongs to the hybrid complex of Cryptocoryne x willisii, whereas Cryptocoryne nevillii is the name of an altogether different species that has nothing to do with C. x willisii. Cryptocoryne parva was also (and sometimes still is) erroneously called "Cryptocoryne nevillii" in the aquarium hobby. The group of C. x willisii originates from riverbanks in the central highlands of Sri Lanka. The plant originally described as Cryptocoryne lucens also belongs to this complex (see Cryptocoryne x willisii “lucens”). It can be discerned from C. x willisii "nevillii" when cultivated under the same conditions by its longer very narrowly lanceolate leaves. The leaf blades of C. x willisii "nevillii" are shorter, longish-ovate to lanceolate. In both varieties, the upper sides of the leaves are medium green and show no pattern. Both varieties cannot always safely be discerned from each other, and, in addition, some more forms of C. x willisii are in cultivation. Small plants of C. x willisii may closely resemble C. parva. Nano tanks, ground cover
73 Limnobium laevigatum (Amazonekikkerbeet) surface 0 0 0 0 4 35 5,00 8,00 0 14 0 40 10 50 0.1 3 0.01 0.5 medium - high Central America, South America very fast easy https://aquaplants.org/pics/ Limnobium laevigatum, Amazon frogbit, is a floating plant that looks a bit like a very large duckweed. It is native to lakes, ponds and slow-flowing rivers in all of Central and South America. Compared with the North American frogbit species Limnobium spongia, which is only rarely cultivated in aquaria these days, it is much more adaptable especially regarding temperature. Common frogbit (Hydrocharis morsus-ranae), native to Europe and Western Asia, is hardy and thus a great pond plant. It hibernatives in the form of winter buds (turions), and, other than Limnobium laevigatum, it is possibly not apt to live in a tropical tank in the long run. The growth habit of the Amazon frogbit is comparable to other floating plants. The floating rosette forms runners regularly, at whose ends young plants grow. In calm-water zones of the aquarium, carpets of these plants will form after a relatively short time, which may lead to uncalled-for shading of the ground. Under strong light, with good fertilisation and high air humidity, emersed leaves may form above the waterline. CO2 injection furthers growth. This plant may even flower in the aquarium, although rarely. Propagation happens automatically. Under optimal conditions you will have a large quantity of frogbit very soon in your tank. Many people don't see how floating plants help an aquarium layout, as they create shaded areas and grow very long vertical roots. However, just these aspects can be integrated into a design. The play of shade and light can create interesting contrasts in a layout, and the elegant-looking roots may have a very decorative effect.
name usage height max licht oorsprong groeisnelheid moeilijkheid